Clutch Interviews Stones Insight On Trust, PR, & Brand Reputation

Clutch Interviews Stones Insight On Trust, PR, & Brand Reputation

In a recent survey conducted by Clutch, a B2B research firm based in Washington, DC, three brands (United Airlines, Pepsi, and Uber) were analyzed to determine the relationship between PR crises and brand reputation. Clutch interviewed me to comment on the survey findings and to offer my opinion about how trust plays a significant role in maintaining brand reputation.

When Your Brand Has To Talk

When Your Brand Has To Talk

There is always some hot new idea in branding, endlessly hyped with breathless promises of game-changing and revolutionary disruption, always discussed as if it is just right around the corner. The latest has been about automation (the trifecta of robotics, digital assistants, and artificial intelligence), proclaiming industry disruption, transforming consumer behavior, even predicting massive economic upheaval with massive job displacement. Reality or hype?

Something Has Changed

Something Has Changed

There is the saying “everything old becomes new again.” But I feel there’s been a more substantive shift in culture. We now have access to data that we’ve never had before, with unprecedented immediacy. Add on advanced analytical methods and artificial intelligence, and then sprinkle in the immediacy of sharing “thought, word, and deed.” What I’ve realized is that it is not the underlying principals that have changed, but rather the influence and permanence of the systems that govern them. 

Defining Cultural Systems - Module 1

Lean agencies or marketing groups rarely have the time or money to conduct marketing research, yet they still need powerful insights to develop effective solutions to business problems. The solution is using the existing data you have in the context of cultural systems. 

Cultural systems are the complex set of actions, beliefs, and customs that are present any group, and can be deconstructed to understand how any system works.

Understanding Cultural Systems - Introduction

A big problem many small organizations face is a lack of time and money to do marketing research - the kind that larger companies seem to have at their disposal. But any small business will tell you that understanding customers is critical to their success, probably even more so than for their bigger competitors. I'm kicking off a series about how you can overcome this challenge and still get powerful insights that will help focus your strategy and guide creative direction. It's about quickly and affordably getting meaningful insights that will inspire confidence in your clients or prospects. 

The key is leveraging the vast amount of data that already exists, which yes, is quite obvious. But what's important is then analyzing that data in the context of cultural systems. Cultural systems are the powerful social forces that shape how we think, relate or act, often without our even knowing how they are influencing us. It’s what shaped us as we grew up, and what continues to influence us as we go about day-to-day life. 

It's things like kinship, how we’ve come to believe what is attractive or healthy, the role of rituals and tradition, even the physical space around us as we interact with something or someone. 

I am going to talk about how to start thinking in terms of cultural positioning, or where your brand fits into day-to-day life. This is opposed to classical market positioning, a fairly intellectual exercise, where we analyze where a brand fits vis-a-vis its competitors. We are going to learn how your brand can successfully evolve in this rapid iteration,  business environment we live in. The next video is a good one, explaining what cultural systems are and using the concept of "social power" in the recent election as an example. 

 

Embracing Bias (Part 2): Analyst, know thyself.

Embracing Bias (Part 2): Analyst, know thyself.

I recently watched a focus group react to some concepts and after, colleagues shared conclusions that surprised me. I marveled at how our personal biases were shaping what we heard and saw. We don’t often consider this bias in our thinking, but we should because it leads to a better perspective. We realize we are applying our meaning to what people say or do which is not necessarily their meaning.

Embracing Bias (Part 1)

Embracing Bias (Part 1)

As data analysts, we pride ourselves on being unbiased or objective, and when we are designing research, we diligently seek to reduce sources of bias. Constructing research this way is considered a best practice of our trade. But is that the only bias that exists? Are we also considering the unavoidable social and cultural forces that subconsciously shape human behavior and perceptions?

Spiral Thinking

Spiral Thinking

There is a mistaken belief that failure is bad. Companies focus on adherence to plan over speed to market because predictability and stability are preferred over short-term variability. The problem is, with constantly changing technology and a rapidly transforming business environment, focusing on predictability, safety and stability will increase business risk rather than decrease it. 

Good/Cheap/Fast - Pick Two. Not Any More!

Good/Cheap/Fast - Pick Two. Not Any More!

There is the old saying in business, “Good, cheap or fast - choose any two.” It’s always had an immutable feeling to it, even as massive changes in technology and culture rocked traditional business processes. It’s time to pronounce this classic belief disrupted as well. Working eight years in a small agency and the last year with lots of startups has taught me “good/cheap/fast” insights are absolutely possible. It’s a matter of learning how to put existing data in the context of the cultural systems in which it was generated.

Are you asking the right questions?

Are you asking the right questions?

In today’s “big data” environment, it’s easy to get caught up boiling the ocean in search of a powerful insight that inspires strategies and tactics that lead to social conversations, deeper brand affinity and ultimately increased sales. We’ve come to believe this is possible through the powerful and evolving ability to capture and processvast amounts of data. But are we asking ourselves the right questions?

The problem with our perspectives...

The problem with our perspectives...

I’ve noticed a discernible uptick in the number of blogs/articles/posts on Millennials and Boomers. They fall into two camps.

  • Camp 1: Boomers gifting “advice” to millennials about their sense of entitlement.
  • Camp 2: Millennials asking boomers to look in the mirror.

The issue is, both generations are looking at the issue from their own cultural bias that is derived from the sum of our lifetime of experiences. We both need to change our perspective.